Flying Low in Kallo (video)

I found myself in Kallo again a couple of weeks ago. There hasn’t been too much leisure time to shoot for Maisemassa.com lately, but now I had. I prepared for the shoot the day before: charged the batteries, emptied the SD card, practiced some slick camera moves with DJI Osmo and checked the weather forecast. The next evening was supposed to be lovely. Maybe few clouds, but overall the weather was to be sunny. Perfect for some cliche sunset footage.

As you probably figured out already, the next day was not sunny! When I checked the current weather of Kallo it said cloudy 9/8. What the hell does that even mean, I wondered. Well, it means fog, haze, mist or whatever you want to call it. Would it have been better to call off the day? Absolutely not! There is nothing more amazingly intriguing than a mystical haze floating around. If I could have asked for more, there would’ve also been a flock of bats and an abandoned ship drifting ashore. But you can’t have it all. Unless you have a massive budget or decent visual fx skills, then you can have whatever you want on the screen.

DJI Osmo and Extension Rod
DJI Osmo and Extension Rod

Back to the real life. All  I really wanted to do was to shoot low angle smooth flying shots combined with “jib-like” movement. I thought this kind of stuff would work nicely in Kallo. Also I wanted to see what you can do with the combination of DJI Osmo and Extension Rod. What I found out was, that you can do a lot, but there are limitations and you need to practice.

Here’s a list of thoughts
– “The ninja walk” is essential  Osmo Quick Tips: The Walk
– You can hide imperfect walking technique by filming 50 fps and slowing it down in post.
– You must walk slower when you shoot 25 fps instead of 50 fps if you want the footage to blend seemingly together in edit.
– I did use some stabilizing in post, but that was mainly because of a bad filming technique.
– Osmo + Extension Rod combo is amazingly light. You can fiddle with it hours without wearing out your arms.
– Use of ND-filters is a must. There is no aperture control on X3 camera.
– Changing ND-filters is a pain in the ass. If anyone knows a decent variable ND-filter for X3 camera, please comment below 🙂
– Image quality is decent, but not amazing. I shot only 1080p (with D-LOG profile), so can’t really say anything about the quality of 4K video.
– YouTube basically butchers the image quality. Still figuring out what is the best way to export to YouTube.
– I used ISO 200-800. I wouldn’t go over ISO 400 if I had a choice.
– You should add some sort of a horizontal handle to the Extension Rod for better grip. Still looking solution for this one.
– If you need good audio, you’ll be better off with external audio recorder. I used Zoom H1 to get some ambient sounds.
– DJI Osmo is not weather sealed, be careful. Almost soaked mine when hovering above the water.

…One morOtsikkokuva_Best-compromise_720pe thing I wanted to write about is the YouTube image quality. I wrote about it earlier, but since I had some major problems with this Low Flying -video I tried couple of things to get somewhat decent streaming quality. I think I’ll get back to that subject in the next post. The working title is “The Never-ending Fight with Export Settings”.

 

Gear List

  • DJI Osmo with Extension Rod and Zenmuse X3 camera
  • Haida NanoPro ND Kits for DJI Inspire 1
  • Zoom H1 Handy Recorder

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 The best 1080p export settings for YouTube
Kallo (video)

 

The island of Kallo

8.4.2015 – The weather forecast said it would be a stormy day. I thought I would have a perfect opportunity to shoot some photos down by the seaside. So I went to Kallo, which is a little rocky island by the Pori coastline (location on map). You can drive there through a narrow neck of land.

After I got to the location I thought it would be better to shoot video after all. I ditched the tripod because I wanted to be able to move fast and smoothly when needed. So I attached variable ND filter, pistol grip camera handle for better ergonomics, RØDE VideoMic and wivi VF-3 DSLR view finder thus transforming my 5D mark III to a run and gun video camera.

Of course there will be some shakiness when shooting handheld. Great help is the EF 24-105mm f/4L lens with image stabilizer and the warp stabilizer effect in Adobe PremierePro.

First I went to the wooded part of the tiny island. The wind was not so apparent there, but you could here the roaring sea nearby. I grabbed few shots in the forest, which I thought would work well in the beginning of the video. Then I headed to the shore. Soon the lightly salty baltic sea water started to dribble on the ND-filter. I was afraid it would cause a permanent damage, but luckily it didn’t. In the edited video a few shots are kind of fuzzy because of this.

Rocks of Kallo. Shutter speed of 1/6th of a second was used to get some controlled motion blur, which should look good in timelapse sequence.
Rocks of Kallo. Shutter speed of 1/6th of a second was used to get some controlled motion blur, which should look good in timelapse sequence.

The last take is a timelapse sequence shot with TB3 and motorized slider. The wind speed was around 20 m/s and I knew it would cause some trouble. I chose to go with the idea I had despite the challenges. I wanted to use shutter speed of 1/6th of a second to get some controlled motion blur. Because the camera and the TB3 combination had such a big wind resistance, I knew there was no way to avoid unwanted shakiness and uncontrolled motion blur. Fortunately the issues could be fixed in post to some extent.

Gear List

Video:

  • EOS 5D Mark III (+Magic Lantern)
  • Canon EF 24-105mm f/4L IS USM
  • Haida variable ND filter
  • Pistol grip camera handle
  • VisionTech -picture style
  • RØDE VideoMic with the Windcutter windscreen

Timelapse:

  • EOS 5D Mark III (+Magic Lantern)
  • Canon EF 24-105mm f/4L IS USM
  • eMotimo TB3 + Rhino Pro 4FT
  • Anker 2nd Gen Astro Pro2 20000mAh battery
  • Triopo MT-2205+KJ-1S

Post

  • Video edited with Adobe Premiere
  • Holy Grain ULTIMATEGRAIN BUNDLE ( http://holygrain.com/ )
  • Timelapse edited with LRTimelapse and Adobe Lightroom

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Searching for the sun

4.4.2013. – Waiting for the spring sun on the ice at Yyteri ( location on map ). It took almost two hours to shoot this timelapse. The idea was to have a human figure on the scene with a sort of animated movement. Since there was no volunteers, I had to be the puppet.

Exposure and all the other settings were constant throughout the shoot.
Exposure and all the other settings were constant throughout the shoot.

Basically everytime I heard the camera shutter sound, I moved myself a bit. The final timelapse would be rendered as 25 frames per second video. Interval between frames when shooting was four seconds. In a nutshell, every second in the finalized timelapse was about 1,5 minutes in real life. I can only imagine what passers-by thought when they saw me trying to imitate movement in slow-motion. And as you can see from the timelapse, I wasn’t slow enough.

Gear List

  • EOS 5D Mark III
  • Canon EF 24-105mm f/4L IS USM
  • Hähnel GIGA T Pro Remote Control
  • Tripod

Post

  • Timelapse edited with LRTimelapse and Adobe Lightroom
  • Finalized with Adobe Premiere

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